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Remote Research in the Archives

The archivists at The New School created this guide to help you navigate the world of researching archives from the safety of your home. We hope you can use these tips into the future when more archives -- including The New School Archives -- re-open for

Digital Collections

On the Digital Collections website, you can access nearly 18,000 items from The New School Archives from the comfort of your own home. This includes photographs, documents, drawings, video and audio recordings. On this site, you can use the search bar to find digital archives, browse by collection or person, or take a look at special topics. Plus, you can download any of the items on this website and save them for your research.

 

However, it’s important to remember that not everything in The New School Archives is available in a digital format--we have millions of pieces of paper in our collections, and it would be impossible to scan it all! For a more complete picture of the Archives’ holdings, see our collection guides.

 

Collection Guides (Finding Aids)

The archives are organized into collections: groupings of material that have the same creator or content. These collections are described by finding aids (also called collection guides), which offer information on the contents of each collection, contextual information about its creation, and information about how to access it. See the next section, “Using finding aids for remote research” for more information on how you can use these guides.


 

New School Histories

New School Histories is a great place to start your research on any topic related to The New School and its history. Students, faculty, and staff have contributed short blog posts on The New School’s divisions, people, and buildings. This is a secondary source, but many of the articles cite material from The New School Archives.